Tag Archives: Grave

New photos of Lizzie’s grave from Kris Waldherr

Updates to Photograph’s of Elizabeth Siddal’s Grave: Author and artist Kris Waldherr recently made the pilgrimage to Lizzie’s grave and has generously shared her photos.   She is the author of Doomed Queens, The Lover’s Path and The Book of Goddesses, and creator of The Goddess Tarot.  Visit her website.

I’ve added a total of ten new photographs, plus Kris’s account of her visit at the bottom of Photographs of Elizabeth Siddal’s Grave. For those of you subscribed to this site through email or feed reader, here’s a preview:

Photographs of Elizabeth Siddal’s Grave

A good photograph of Elizabeth Siddal’s grave has been on my wishlist of items I’ve desired for LizzieSiddal.com. So imagine my surprise and gratitude when I received a message from a visitor who was lucky enough to have visited her grave in 1985 Thank you, Jack Challem, for being such a kind friend to this site. I know that visitors will appreciate a close look at Lizzie’s final resting place, since that area of Highgate Cemetery is closed to visitors. If any of you have ever visited Highgate, I’d love to hear your comments in general…even if you were unable to see the Rossetti plot. UPDATE: LizzieSiddal.com started in 2004 with no photos of Lizzie’s grave and now there are several!  I am so grateful to everyone who has been kind enough to share.

I am so grateful that Rhonda Parsons has shared a photo of herself at Lizzie’s grave, taken in 1995.  Rhonda says that she has had an interest in Pre-Raphaelite art since she was 18 years old, and is particularly drawn to the life of Elizabeth Siddal.

Rhonda Parsons at Elizabeth Siddal's grave.

Rhonda Parsons at Elizabeth Siddal’s grave.

Recently, another visitor to this site was able to visit Lizzie’s grave.  I am so grateful that they were kind enough to share the photos of what must have been a lovely trip — I’m told that after viewing Lizzie’s grave, they visited the Tate and saw Lizzie as Ophelia, as well as the other PRB masterpieces they have there.  I’ve chosen to include all of the photos on this page.  I apologize if this creates a slow loading time for any of you, but I thought you might like to absorb all of these photos all at once.  Highgate is a breathtaking place and I’m sad that I haven’t been able to visit in person yet.  But, my day will come!

Egyptian Avenue

Egyptian Avenue

Egyptian Avenue

Egyptian Avenue

Circle of Lebanon

Circle of Lebanon

Pathway

Pathway

The Rossetti/Siddal grave

The Rossetti/Siddal grave

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Rebecca Lubas was also kind enough to share photos from her visit in 1993.   The photos below are shared using  the following license.  Please click the Creative Commons icon and read the terms specified before sharing or using them.   Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License.

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Added November 11, 2010. I am so grateful to Sam, a dedicated volunteer at Highgate Cemetery, for sending not only these beautiful  photos, but for also giving the slab a good scrubbing so that we can all see these words better.

Added December 1, 2010:   Author and artist Kris Waldherr recently made the pilgrimage to Lizzie’s grave and has generously shared her photos.  She’s also posted a comment on this page, which I’ll share below.  She is the author of Doomed Queens, The Lover’s Path and The Book of Goddesses, and creator of The Goddess Tarot.  Visit her website.

I was fortunate to visit Lizzie’s grave last Friday. Her grave is in the West Cemetery, which has restricted access due to its fragile condition. Lizzie’s grave is down a hidden, isolated and ivy-strewn pathway which was slick with autumn leaves. Interestingly my guide said that she’s visited by more men than women–and the men tend to weep. One even became visibly angry and ranted about how she was abused by Rossetti. “I think the women who visit are made of sterner stuff,” my guide concluded. Was glad to see there were some flowers recently left to which I added my offering. I brought her a peach-colored rose, which reminded me of her complexion in the first Beata Beatrice oil painting by Rossetti.